"Our whole team has a copy of Keyword Researcher, we use it for everyone of our client's keyword research for the 'Long Tail' and we use it every day to come up with blog post ideas and ideas for guest posting. We couldn't live without this tool. I have used every paid keyword research tool under the sun, and this by far is my favorite tool for mining the Long Tail."

Matthew, are you still using LTP as part of your strategy given the changes with Google AdWords and MOS the past few months. None of their training reflects these changes in the video tutorials, so it’s a bit slower on the learning curve and seems very limiting on some of the LT Keyword options that are registering no data, when we know there is search data for certain words. Seems like something that was designed to work incredibly smooth is playing catch up from changes in 2 major areas, MOZ and Google.


"I've used many keyword tools over the years and Keyword Researcher is up there amongst the most useful of them. Apart from being a great way to get ideas for content, as an AdWords consultant, I also use it to uncover words and phrases that my clients would not want to be bidding on (negative keywords). This is a real time saver for me and a budget enhancer for my clients! All in all, this is a great app and should be used by any professional search engine marketer."

In order to know which keywords to target, it's essential to not only understand the demand for a given term or phrase, but also the work required to achieve high rankings. If big brands take the top 10 results and you're just starting out on the web, the uphill battle for rankings can take years of effort. This is why it's essential to understand keyword difficulty.


If you're a regular blogger, these are probably the topics you blog about most frequently. Or perhaps they're the topics that come up the most in sales conversations. Put yourself in the shoes of your buyer personas -- what types of topics would your target audience search that you'd want your business to get found for? If you were a company like HubSpot, for example -- selling marketing software (which happens to have some awesome SEO tools ... but I digress ;-) -- you might have general topic buckets like "inbound marketing," "blogging," "email marketing," "lead generation," "SEO," "social media," "marketing analytics," and "marketing automation."
Quick question… in your review you mentioned focusing on some products like ProductNamethat are spelled as Product Name and are low competition. My question is how would you tackle a review using a keyword like that? Would you make that the primary one that is misspelled? Would you mix them with the spaced spelling and correct spelling? I’ve found some good ones and would appreciate some direction on how you’d handle writing a post to rank for the spaced keyword?
So what exactly is Keyword Competitiveness (KC)? It’s only the feature within Long Tail Pro that completely changed the game and made keyword research so ridiculously simple that even a dumb truck driver like me could become an expert! It basically works like this. As soon as you click the button in Long Tail Pro Cloud to retrieve keywords, it automatically calculates a number for each keyword (between 1 and 100) based on several different SEO factors. Lower numbers mean the keyword is easier to rank for and higher means it is harder to rank for. More on that below…

Wordtracker is another service that requires an annual subscription to utilize all of its features. Their database is made up of 330 million search terms, collected from the major metacrawlers, Dogpile and Metacrawler, and is updated weekly. The search data they show is a record of the number of times the exact keyword or phrase has been searched in the United States over the last 365 days. As in the case of Keyword Discovery, this difference in default keyword matching type causes Wordtracker to display search volumes significantly lower than what Google’s tools show.


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3. Set your pre-search filters. Depending on whether you are looking for a new niche to build a site around or trying to find keywords to target on your already existing website, the minimum amount of local monthly searches (LMS) you set might vary. For new niches my LMS criteria is 1,500-5,000 searches, for posts anything from 10-800 is fine. Also, depending on one of these goals you can add a lower or higher number of words in the respective filter: for new niches 3 (or, at times, 2) words minimum, for new posts from 3 or 4 words up.

This tool was originally created to carry out keyword research for paid campaigns using Google's AdWords platform. However, it can also be used to research organic keywords, providing estimated global/local monthly search volumes for keywords (i.e. their popularity) and their competition (i.e. how difficult they are to rank for) for organic search.
What I really like about them is extensive detail including the keyword difficulty. Ahrefs uses clickstream data to also show how many clicks you will get from the search engine. This is very useful after knowledge graph integration, as many keywords may have huge traffic but they hardly get any clicks from the search engine. Reason being, they get answers directly from the Google search result. Example of one such query is: “birthdate of any celebrity”
Most people who use the Google’s auto complete feature to generate keywords that they include in their blog title or page find Soovle to be a very useful tool. This tool moves the auto complete feature a step forward by getting inputs from several sources like Amazon, Yahoo, Wikipedia, Bing apart from Google itself. This assists the user to generate keywords that drive online traffic in a better way. The default is usually set to Google but you can switch to the other options at your own will and view how the outcome keeps on changing. You can experiment with a broad range of keywords by running them through a specialized tool such as the keyword inspector as a way of extracting value that will boost your sales on Amazon.
Just came on this program this morning and downloaded a trial version. Could this program really be only $97? Is this portion of the program effective or do you need the $300-plus Platinum version? The KC score, available in the $300-plus version, seems critical to making the whole thing work really well. Are you possibly leaving money and success on the table by not biting the bullet and going for the expensive program?

Hey Alex – this is a good question. No tool is going to be spot on. My advice is to not look too much into the accuracy of the metrics, but look at it more as a relative measure. I’m finding Ahrefs to be a good barometer for keyword competitiveness, but I’ve also heard great things about KW Finder lately. I think it’ll more come to personal preference. Both are solid options.
This is another common reason people won’t get Long Tail Pro. Their stubbornness can stem from many reasons – including the two mentioned above. Too stubborn to pay for it (can be confused with too cheap to pay). Or too stubborn to learn about the benefits. But the main reason is that lots of people actually think that they are better off without Long Tail Pro. Either they do their keyword research the free (hard) way which takes a LOT of time and knowledge and usually isn’t very effective. Or they use a different keyword research tool which they think is better. Let me just tell you – there is no better or more effective keyword research tool than Long Tail Pro. More than 70,000 marketers can’t be wrong and over the past few years Long Tail Pro has become the standard when it comes to keyword research tools.
You can also ask Long Tail Pro to get extra information like “Global Search Volume” (amount of monthly searches globally for each exact-match search term), “Domain Availability” (to see if exact-match domains are available), “Google Title Competition” and “Bing Title Competition” (this is the “allintitle” search that checks the number of sites that are using the same keyword in the title of their pages).
Bing Webmaster Toolbox: Oh yeah, remember that other search engine? Yes that’s right Bing has a whole collection of tools of their own, including keyword tools. The data will be taken from Bing itself, which means that you should be able to make relative assumptions about keyword popularity. because lets face it, Bing users aren’t that different than Google’s.

You don’t really need to worry about the volume size either. Too big a number just means you will have to work harder to get ranked in Google. It’s now quite commonplace to see SEO people say it’s best to just go with your gut feeling on a keyword. Just go for something you would type into Google search yourself instead of beating yourself up trying to find that ‘one’ killer keyword.
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They’ll show you information like how many external links the site has, the number of Facebook and Google+ shares, estimated visits per month, and its page authority. All of this is valuable intel that can give you insight into where your page could potentially rank against them, without needing to do more research with a separate tool or on another page.
I ditto what you are saying. All of the keyword volume data the system is stating is completely way off, false and misleading. They are pulling these numbers now from 3rd party sources, which we all know are directional, but in many cases in left field! I just signed up and will probably be cancelling because I can’t trust or rely on their data. What a shame, because before it was such a great tool.
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