Mr. Dean I wanted to drop in and personally thank you for everything you do for us rookies in the online marketing field. I have learned so much from your lessons/guides/articles/videos you name it! I also been using Raven Tools and find it pretty helpful as well in regards to keyword research, what say you? Look forward to all your future posts! Also, it says a lot about you that you actually take the time and respond to the comments that users leave you in your articles, don’t really see that too often these days! All the best!
You can also ask Long Tail Pro to get extra information like “Global Search Volume” (amount of monthly searches globally for each exact-match search term), “Domain Availability” (to see if exact-match domains are available), “Google Title Competition” and “Bing Title Competition” (this is the “allintitle” search that checks the number of sites that are using the same keyword in the title of their pages).
From time-to-time – there are discounts or promotions available for Long Tail Pro. Whenever these become available – all links on my site that lead to the Long Tail Pro sales page will reflect the discounted price. If there is a huge sale or a massive deal – I always let my email subscribers know about it as soon as possible. If you’re not on my email list yet – feel free to sign up by clicking the button below. I’ll even send you one of my FREE guides!
Repeat this exercise for as many topic buckets as you have. And remember, if you're having trouble coming up with relevant search terms, you can always head on over to your employees on the front lines -- like Sales or Services -- and ask them what types of terms their prospects and customers use, or common questions they have. Those are often great starting points for keyword research.
If you already create niche websites, you can clearly see how everything I’ve discussed above will benefit you. In fact, you probably already understood all of it. But maybe you are a blogger who has never thought of creating a niche website. Is this you? Let me tell you – if you can create a blog, you can create a niche website. It is not hard at all to create a small site, laser focused on a very specific topic, that will earn at least enough to make Long Tail Pro pay for itself.
To be able to rank in the search engines is an art that must be understood and finding the right Keyword tool that fits into your comfort zone is a must. What I mean by ‘comfort zone’ is having a keyword tool that doesn’t confuse you before you begin even searching. Some go into far too much detail than is necessary. All you need really are good long tail ‘common sense’ keywords that other marketers may have missed.
Settings. This tiny gear icon on the right upper corner is where you can ask support for “Help”, toggle on or off the help icons; manage “User Accounts” (you need to enter your Google AdWords credentials when the software is run for the first time plus your Moz API details too, which are free to get since LTP uses a both AdWords and Moz’s data); set the “Data Fetching Speed”; and check the “Show Runtime Error” and “Show Debug Panel” in the “Debug” section (which can be very helpful when there’s something wrong with the tool or with your Google AdWords account).
Note: If you can’t justify using Ahrefs on a monthly basis, you could sign up for a month, do your KW research and cancel. That said, if you can justify the monthly pricing it’s well worth keeping because you’ll get access to the ongoing functionality such as rank tracking and web monitoring. It also means there’s no need to use any other tools to track rankings or monitor mentions on the web.
Mr. Dean I wanted to drop in and personally thank you for everything you do for us rookies in the online marketing field. I have learned so much from your lessons/guides/articles/videos you name it! I also been using Raven Tools and find it pretty helpful as well in regards to keyword research, what say you? Look forward to all your future posts! Also, it says a lot about you that you actually take the time and respond to the comments that users leave you in your articles, don’t really see that too often these days! All the best!
The team at E2M is taking this opportunity to analyze other significant (and free to use/try) keyword research tools out there. We are asking ourselves what data and logic should ideally go into keyword research, how this logic can be programmatically applied to the creation of tools, and what the best ways are to consolidate and use their output. Here’s a quick look at 25 other keyword research tools, some well-known and some you’d do well to know. These are not alternatives to the AdWords Keyword Tool on their own, but each of them performs some function of the AdWords tool in its own unique way, and all of them aid and abet your keyword research quite well.
Here’s where this tool’s value really comes in: Keyword Tool has keyword research tools for multiple search engines, not just Google. If you want to do keyword research for YouTube, Bing, Amazon, the App Store, or eBay, they’ve got keyword suggestions (and data) for you. If YouTube videos, for example, are a central part of your marketing strategy, this could easily be worth the money.
What are people looking for on your site? These terms are keywords in the vocabulary of your actual audience and should definitely be added to your keyword list. Do not forget to look at the keywords people filled in that didn’t get any results: this was stuff people were expecting but didn’t find. You can look into the results of your internal search in Google Analytics at Behavior → Site Search → Search Terms.

When you’re running the Rank Checker feature sometimes you see Google’s captchas pop up and which can be annoying. I have only experienced this on a computer with an old OS (Windows XP) though; I haven’t seen this on Windows 7 or Windows 10 machines. Again, if you close the software and reopen it after a few minutes, everything will be okay again. UPDATE: one of the latest updates fixed this issue.


To drive search engine traffic, whether through organic search or paid search advertisements, you need the right keywords, plus a process to expand your keyword lists over time. That’s where our free tool comes in. WordStream’s Free Keyword Tool gives you hundreds of relevant keyword results, plus additional, actionable information like competition level and estimated CPC, all for free!
If you're a regular blogger, these are probably the topics you blog about most frequently. Or perhaps they're the topics that come up the most in sales conversations. Put yourself in the shoes of your buyer personas -- what types of topics would your target audience search that you'd want your business to get found for? If you were a company like HubSpot, for example -- selling marketing software (which happens to have some awesome SEO tools ... but I digress ;-) -- you might have general topic buckets like "inbound marketing," "blogging," "email marketing," "lead generation," "SEO," "social media," "marketing analytics," and "marketing automation."
However, KWFinder has a couple of areas where Longtail Pro outshines it. Firstly, I like the fact LTP provides you with a suggested keyword competitiveness to target (as described above). More significantly, I don’t like the way that KWFinder restricts your number of keyword suggestions if you choose their cheaper pricing tier – it feels like they’re holding back some of the power of the software unless you pay more. With LongTailPro, you can see as many keyword suggestions you like so long as you’re within your monthly allowance.
If you’re serious about making a success of blogging, you need a keyword research tool like this. Such tools can also prove useful before you even begin. If you have several ideas, you can do your research up-front, and see which niche gives you the most chance of success, and which is already highly competitive. Working this out can save you an awful lot of time and money in the long run.
This comes with a monthly fee though, so why have that recurring revenue drain when you can just get MS or LTP for that matter on a one off fee. They are both virtually the same in my opinion. This is the only thing that is stopping me from buying the software. If the calculation of keyword difficulty was included in the one off fee, i wouldn’t mind paying the full $97.
Analyze Keyword Difficulty – Targeting difficult keywords with the highest competition is not always the best idea. The SEMrush Keyword Difficulty tool helps you determine keywords’ difficulties. By indicating a particular keyword’s percentage of difficulty, this tool helps you estimate how easy it would be to seize your competitors’ organic positions in the SERPs.
I think people's aresenal of keyword research tools are mostly the same: 1) You need a tool to examine search volume, most likely Google Keyword Planner 2) A tool to help you generate more keyword ideas. Tools that work with the search engines' autosuggestions are very popular such as KeywordTool.io and Ubersuggest 3) Then people might add a tool broaden the depth of their data, maybe including something like Google Trends or Moz's Keyword Difficulty tool.
I was going to post screenshots here showing my numbers for the past year – but the dashboards in the old affiliate platforms (Clickbank and JVZoo) don’t provide the best visuals – so I’ll just show you my total affiliate income for the past year. In one year (March 13, 2015 to March 13, 2016) I earned $3867.60 in commissions for promoting Long Tail Pro. Not bad for having just a mildly popular ‘passive income blog’ and only a small email list!
I recently decided to go with ahrefs after using spyfu for a couple years and trialing secockpit. I was a moz client for awhile too about a year ago. I found spyfu data to be sketchy (or just plain wrong) fairly often, and moz, I don’t know, just didn’t seem like they were really into supporting what I wanted to know. secockpit was achingly slow for a trickle of data. ahrefs isn’t nearly so graph-y as spyfu, but they are so blazing fast and the data is so deep. I enjoy it a great deal, even if it is spendy.
I think people's aresenal of keyword research tools are mostly the same: 1) You need a tool to examine search volume, most likely Google Keyword Planner 2) A tool to help you generate more keyword ideas. Tools that work with the search engines' autosuggestions are very popular such as KeywordTool.io and Ubersuggest 3) Then people might add a tool broaden the depth of their data, maybe including something like Google Trends or Moz's Keyword Difficulty tool.
If only it were that easy – right? I’ll be the first to admit – it’s not always that easy. I’ve created lots and lots of these types of sites over the past few years – and only a handful of them worked out. It can be a very hit or miss thing. But I do have one site in particular that I would like to highlight for you. It happens to be the very first niche website that I ever created! Why highlight this specific site? Because my very first attempt at a niche site happens to still earn more than enough money each month to pay for the expenses associated with Long Tail Pro! Check out the screenshot below from my Adsense account which shows stats for just this one site for exactly one year previous from the day that I am writing this post.
I also hang out in SEO forums and groups and see KC scores tossed around and talked about and pretty much everybody is on the same page. Most agree that you can’t completely rely on the KC score (there are a few factors that can’t quantitatively be measured with a number) – but that the KC score is a VERY good indicator of the competition level for specific keywords. The following diagram realistically shows exactly what to expect from certain KC scores…
Long tail keywords can find people who are later in the buying cycle, and more ready to buy. For example, somebody searching for “tents” is probably early in the buying cycle, just starting to research what they want. Whereas somebody who searches for “North Face Kaiju 4 person tent” already knows what they want, and is more likely to be ready to buy.
This database was built using data from BEFORE Google required active ad accounts to get good keyword data & before they started blending data together for similar terms. Even if you set up an AdWords account and spend significant sums of money with them, they may require you to run your ad campaign for 3 or 4 months straight before they will show reasonably precise data instead of exceptionally broad data ranges.
This makes Google Suggest a relevant source for keyword research, it contains a large amount of organic keywords very closely related to a full or partial keyword and can be used to find additional most searched appending keywords that make the whole keyword less competitive. Google Suggest can be researched through the Google Search website or through a compatible browser for a small amount of keywords but also in large scale using free scraper tools.

SEMrush is a very useful tool for both researching competitors when starting a site or for growing an established site. I really like to find weaker niche sites that still seem to be ranking for lots of keywords; SEMrush helps me see what they are ranking for and what I can potentially target. You can also see what keywords you’re on the cusp of ranking for with your established site - another very useful feature.
How do I know this? Because I’ve done it! In late 2013 I was still struggling to earn a respectable income online. I started up a keyword research service and marketed it to just this blog audience. It turned out to be quite popular. Basically – I would find niches using Long Tail Pro then create Keyword Research Packages. Each package contained usually several hundred keywords with KC scores calculated. I was selling these packages for anywhere between $97 to $147. I even sold one single package for $597! That one had very high search volumes and very low competition.
Tax implications vary by country and type of business sale, and more. I did an asset sale to try and take advantage of the lower capital gains tax rate as much as possible. Honestly, the reason we don’t talk about these things much is because I don’t want to give bad advice…I’m not an attorney or accountant, so everyone should seek out their own advice.
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