They also seem to be getting this wrong often enough that I've got less confidence that the keywords that make up these groups really belong there. I recently tried to check the volume for the keyword [active monitoring] (the practice of checking on a network by injecting test traffic and seeing how it's handled, as opposed to passive monitoring) and the Keyword Planner gave me the volume for [activity monitor] (aka Fitbit).

Earlier, I wrote a post about the use of long tail keywords. Focusing on long tail keywords could be a good strategy, especially when trying to rank in a highly competitive market. But how do you decide on which (long tail) keywords you want to rank? This post will give you some handy tips and keyword research tools to make your keyword research a bit easier.


I came across Longtail Pro this morning, downloaded the trial version and was about to buy the $97 program…seems like a good buy. But the more research I’ve done today, it seems the KC score is an absolute must for anyone who is serious about making money with niche sites. I hate to spend the bucks, but hate even more leaving money and possibly niche site success. Any advice?
Once I have a list of phrases, rankings, and volumes from these tools, I'll look to internal tools (maybe Excel, Access, or another database) to organize, classify, and forecast opportunity. This is where I'll estimate a competitor's traffic based on volume & position CTR, set goals for a target position, and estimate traffic based off that position's CTR and keyword volume.
Google Webmaster SEO Starter Guide - Originally written for Google Employees to improve website performance with users and search engines. Related Terms: SERP - Search Engine Rank Position  |  PageRank (PR) - Named for Google Co-founder, Larry Page. The PR Scale of 0-10 rates a web page. In the past, rank was based on the number of high ranking links pointing to the website. Recently factors like relevance and quality have gained importance. This website's current PR rating: 
Quick question… in your review you mentioned focusing on some products like ProductNamethat are spelled as Product Name and are low competition. My question is how would you tackle a review using a keyword like that? Would you make that the primary one that is misspelled? Would you mix them with the spaced spelling and correct spelling? I’ve found some good ones and would appreciate some direction on how you’d handle writing a post to rank for the spaced keyword?
4. Set post-search filters. After your keyword suggestion fetch is completed — which might take a while if you input a lot of seed keywords — you need to filter your list. You can: filter out keywords that don’t include buyer modifiers like “best”, “buy”, “purchase”, “discount”, “review” (it’s possible to input one or more words in the filter field at the same time: just separate the words with a comma); add a minimum and maximum amount of LMS; set a minimum amount in “Suggested Bid”; and check for only high “Advertiser Competition” keywords.
The Google Keyword Tool is SUPER helpful for building a foundation for your keyword research strategy. At the end of the day, these search numbers are coming straight from the horses mouth. You can filter down to a hyper-local level and see which keywords are getting the largest search volume. Plus, with it’s integration with PPC you can get a quick idea about commercial intent by looking at the bid and competition metrics. How much are people bidding on KWs, higher = more likely to generate a return. Usually its aligned with search intent. That said, the trending data is a little less reliable. I would still use Trends to analyze the popularity/ seasonality of KW search volume.
I ditto what you are saying. All of the keyword volume data the system is stating is completely way off, false and misleading. They are pulling these numbers now from 3rd party sources, which we all know are directional, but in many cases in left field! I just signed up and will probably be cancelling because I can’t trust or rely on their data. What a shame, because before it was such a great tool.
Hey Alex – this is a good question. No tool is going to be spot on. My advice is to not look too much into the accuracy of the metrics, but look at it more as a relative measure. I’m finding Ahrefs to be a good barometer for keyword competitiveness, but I’ve also heard great things about KW Finder lately. I think it’ll more come to personal preference. Both are solid options.
Long Tail Pro is a keyword research tool. Keyword research helps you find exact keywords that people are actually searching for. Some keywords are high competition (meaning it is harder to rank for on your site) and some have lower competition (easier for you to rank). How does Long Tail Pro work? First it finds the actual keywords for you based on the ‘seed keywords’ that you input. Then it helps you analyze the competition to see which keywords will be harder or easier for you to rank. How does this benefit you? You can take those ‘easier to rank’ keywords and use them in your content to increase search engine traffic to your site.
The final sales price was based on a multiple of trailing 12 months net income (i.e. The average net income over the most recent 12 months).  I feel like I got a very good multiple.  I had talked to the brokers at FEinternational, Quiet Light Brokerage, and had viewed sale history of other similar companies, so I know the price I received was very competitive.
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